Don't let me down: The role of operator expectations in human-automation interaction

Andrew K. Mayer, Julian Sanchez, Arthur D. Fisk, Wendy A. Rogers

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

This study investigated how user expectations of automation performance influenced reliance and how expectations interacted with types of automation failures. Participants were assigned to a low, high, or neutral expectations group and interacted with an automated collision avoidance system that either committed errors of false detection (false alarms) or incorrect rejection (misses). Participants with high expectations had higher initial reliance than participants in the low and neutral expectations conditions. Overall, the high expectations group exhibited over-reliance behavior choosing to rely at a higher level than participants in the neutral and low conditions. Participants in the neutral condition began to appropriately adjust their behavior according to the type of automation error, however, participants in the low and high conditions did not. These findings have implications for how expectations are managed in future human-automation research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006
Pages2345-2349
Number of pages5
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006 - San Francisco, CA, United States
Duration: Oct 16 2006Oct 20 2006

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other50th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2006
CountryUnited States
CitySan Francisco, CA
Period10/16/0610/20/06

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

Cite this

Mayer, A. K., Sanchez, J., Fisk, A. D., & Rogers, W. A. (2006). Don't let me down: The role of operator expectations in human-automation interaction. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 50th Annual Meeting, HFES 2006 (pp. 2345-2349). (Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society).