Domesticating dissent: The Kennedys and the freedom rides

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Traditional critiques of social movements have generally explained the strategies of agitators, to the neglect of the discourse of social control which surrounds and frames the movement. Conversely, studies that examine the language of social control often focus on broad issues, such as the “public vocabulary” available to rhetors, rather than on the encounters between authorities and agitators. Antonio Gramsci's concept of hegemony offers a useful way to develop an alternative theoretical approach to the symbolic process of social control. Examination of the Kennedy Administration response to and press coverage of the Freedom Rides in 1961 demonstrates the critical power of an analysis of hegemony, revealing four strategies that domesticated the dissent of the Riders.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)61-78
Number of pages18
JournalCommunication Monographs
Volume59
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1992
Externally publishedYes

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social control
hegemony
Social Movements
neglect
vocabulary
coverage
examination
discourse
language
Dissent
Social Control
Hegemony

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Language and Linguistics

Cite this

Domesticating dissent : The Kennedys and the freedom rides. / Murphy, John M.

In: Communication Monographs, Vol. 59, No. 1, 03.1992, p. 61-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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