Does social behavior drive vole cycles? An evaluation of competing models as they pertain to California voles

Edward Heske, R. S. Ostfeld, W. Z. Lidicker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Plausibility of assumptions behind models which assert that social behavior drives multiannual density cycles is examined, using data on Microtus californicus. Results indicate that 1) critical assumptions of the behavioral polymorphism, social stress, and social breakdown hypotheses are not met; 2) some assumptions of the kin selection hypothesis are met whereas others are not; and 3) assumptions of the habitat patchiness - dispersal hypothesis are met. However, published models of dispersal and habitat patchiness must invoke additional factors, such as resource depletion or predation, before cycles result. Social behavior is unlikely to be a driving force in the generation of cycles in the California vole. -from Authors

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1153-1159
Number of pages7
JournalCanadian journal of zoology
Volume66
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1988

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Animal Science and Zoology

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