Does it matter who’s at risk? Testing message framing and narrative as moderators of the effects of self-referencing in obesity prevention messages targeting Hispanic adults living in the U.S.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study tested whether the effect of self-referencing in a health-marketing message was amplified or attenuated when combined with message framing and narrative. Hispanic adults (N = 146) were randomly assigned to read and respond to an obesity prevention message. Self-referencing messages generated greater cognitive elaboration but only when placed in a narrative. Conversely, self-referencing messages highlighting health risks of obesity produced higher levels of involvement and intention to increase physical activity and healthy eating. Health marketing professionals can use these findings to enhance the effectiveness of obesity prevention messages that target Hispanic adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)22-40
Number of pages19
JournalHealth Marketing Quarterly
Volume37
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2 2020

Keywords

  • healthy eating
  • Hispanic adults
  • Message framing
  • narrative
  • persuasion
  • physical activity
  • self-referencing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health Professions(all)
  • Marketing

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