Do you filter who you are? Excessive self-presentation, social cues, and user evaluations of Instagram selfies

Seoyeon Hong, Mi R. Jahng, Namyeon Lee, Kevin R. Wise

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Innovation in the areas of social media, mobile devices, and wireless connectivity fosters new reflections on communication research, specifically in the area of self-presentation. In this paper, selfies publicly posted on Instagram (N = 1873) were analyzed to see if excessive self-presentation, operationalized as the use of photo filters in selfies, is negatively related to social media users’ evaluation of the person in the selfie. The data showed that using photo filters in selfies was associated with fewer likes received from other social media users. In addition, use of social cues in selfies is positively associated with higher number of likes on Instagram. Theoretical and practical implications of these phenomena are also discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number106159
JournalComputers in Human Behavior
Volume104
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2020

Fingerprint

Social Media
Mobile devices
Cues
Innovation
Communication
Equipment and Supplies
Research
Filter
Evaluation
Self-presentation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Human-Computer Interaction
  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Do you filter who you are? Excessive self-presentation, social cues, and user evaluations of Instagram selfies. / Hong, Seoyeon; Jahng, Mi R.; Lee, Namyeon; Wise, Kevin R.

In: Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 104, 106159, 03.2020.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{1fb7757b1f2b42278e507edaa5af04a6,
title = "Do you filter who you are?: Excessive self-presentation, social cues, and user evaluations of Instagram selfies",
abstract = "Innovation in the areas of social media, mobile devices, and wireless connectivity fosters new reflections on communication research, specifically in the area of self-presentation. In this paper, selfies publicly posted on Instagram (N = 1873) were analyzed to see if excessive self-presentation, operationalized as the use of photo filters in selfies, is negatively related to social media users’ evaluation of the person in the selfie. The data showed that using photo filters in selfies was associated with fewer likes received from other social media users. In addition, use of social cues in selfies is positively associated with higher number of likes on Instagram. Theoretical and practical implications of these phenomena are also discussed.",
author = "Seoyeon Hong and Jahng, {Mi R.} and Namyeon Lee and Wise, {Kevin R.}",
year = "2020",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1016/j.chb.2019.106159",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "104",
journal = "Computers in Human Behavior",
issn = "0747-5632",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Do you filter who you are?

T2 - Excessive self-presentation, social cues, and user evaluations of Instagram selfies

AU - Hong, Seoyeon

AU - Jahng, Mi R.

AU - Lee, Namyeon

AU - Wise, Kevin R.

PY - 2020/3

Y1 - 2020/3

N2 - Innovation in the areas of social media, mobile devices, and wireless connectivity fosters new reflections on communication research, specifically in the area of self-presentation. In this paper, selfies publicly posted on Instagram (N = 1873) were analyzed to see if excessive self-presentation, operationalized as the use of photo filters in selfies, is negatively related to social media users’ evaluation of the person in the selfie. The data showed that using photo filters in selfies was associated with fewer likes received from other social media users. In addition, use of social cues in selfies is positively associated with higher number of likes on Instagram. Theoretical and practical implications of these phenomena are also discussed.

AB - Innovation in the areas of social media, mobile devices, and wireless connectivity fosters new reflections on communication research, specifically in the area of self-presentation. In this paper, selfies publicly posted on Instagram (N = 1873) were analyzed to see if excessive self-presentation, operationalized as the use of photo filters in selfies, is negatively related to social media users’ evaluation of the person in the selfie. The data showed that using photo filters in selfies was associated with fewer likes received from other social media users. In addition, use of social cues in selfies is positively associated with higher number of likes on Instagram. Theoretical and practical implications of these phenomena are also discussed.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85074224352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85074224352&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.chb.2019.106159

DO - 10.1016/j.chb.2019.106159

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:85074224352

VL - 104

JO - Computers in Human Behavior

JF - Computers in Human Behavior

SN - 0747-5632

M1 - 106159

ER -