Do performance trends suggest wide-spread collaborative cheating on asynchronous exams?

Binglin Chen, Matthew West, Craig Zilles

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Using a data set from 29,492 asynchronous exams in an oncampus proctored computer-based testing facility (CBTF), we observed correlations between when a student chooses to take their exam within the exam period and their score on the exam. Somewhat surprisingly, instead of increasing throughout the exam period, which might be indicative of widespread collaborative cheating, we find that exam scores decrease throughout the exam period. While this could be attributed to weaker students putting off exams, this effect holds even when accounting for student ability as measured by a synchronous exam taken during the same semester. This suggests that precautions can be taken by a CBTF to maintain cheating at a low level (e.g., the level of proctored synchronous exams), in spite of the fact that students are taking their exams over a multi-day period.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationL@S 2017 - Proceedings of the 4th (2017) ACM Conference on Learning at Scale
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages111-120
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450344500
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 12 2017
Event4th Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L@S 2017 - Cambridge, United States
Duration: Apr 20 2017Apr 21 2017

Publication series

NameL@S 2017 - Proceedings of the 4th (2017) ACM Conference on Learning at Scale

Other

Other4th Annual ACM Conference on Learning at Scale, L@S 2017
CountryUnited States
CityCambridge
Period4/20/174/21/17

Keywords

  • Asynchronous exams
  • Cheating
  • Computerized testing
  • Student performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Education
  • Software
  • Computer Science Applications

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