Do Confident People Behave Differently? The Role of Defensive Confidence in Partisan Defection, Attention to Politics, and Political Participation

Julia Albarracín, Wei Wang, Dolores Albarracín

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

This chapter reports analyses drawn from the 2006 American National Election Studies Pilot Study. It focuses on the extent to which defensive confidence influences partisan defection and affects other political behaviors. In addition, also considers several interrelated issues: whether or not the levels of defensive confidence differ across demographic and ethnic groups; what we can learn about citizens' attention to politics and government affairs and to the news and if these forms of attention are related to defensive confidence and partisan defection; and if people with higher levels of defensive confidence are more likely to participate in politics than people with lower levels of defensive confidence. The chapter first provides an overview of defensive confidence and its development in the literature. It then presents an analysis of the influence of defensive confidence on partisan defection, attention to government and politics, attention to the news, and political participation.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationImproving Public Opinion Surveys
Subtitle of host publicationInterdisciplinary Innovation and the American National Election Studies
EditorsJohn H Aldrich, Kathleen M McGraw
PublisherPrinceton University Press
Pages46-62
Number of pages17
ISBN (Print)9780691151458
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2011

Keywords

  • defensive confidence
  • partisan defection
  • ethnic groups
  • government
  • political behaviors
  • political participation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

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  • Cite this

    Albarracín, J., Wang, W., & Albarracín, D. (2011). Do Confident People Behave Differently? The Role of Defensive Confidence in Partisan Defection, Attention to Politics, and Political Participation. In J. H. Aldrich, & K. M. McGraw (Eds.), Improving Public Opinion Surveys: Interdisciplinary Innovation and the American National Election Studies (pp. 46-62). Princeton University Press. https://doi.org/10.23943/princeton/9780691151458.003.0004