Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size

Rachel A. Ryskin, Sarah Brown-Schmidt

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Seven experiments use large sample sizes to robustly estimate the effect size of a previous finding that adults are more likely to commit egocentric errors in a false-belief task when the egocentric response is plausible in light of their prior knowledge. We estimate the true effect size to be less than half of that reported in the original findings. Even though we found effects in the same direction as the original, they were substantively smaller; the original study would have had less than 33% power to detect an effect of this magnitude. The influence of plausibility on the curse of knowledge in adults appears to be small enough that its impact on real-life perspective-taking may need to be reevaluated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere92406
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 25 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Do adults show a curse of knowledge in false-belief reasoning? A robust estimate of the true effect size'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this