Diversity of conotoxin types from Conus californicus reflects a diversity of prey types and a novel evolutionary history

C. A. Elliger, T. A. Richmond, Z. N. Lebaric, N. T. Pierce, Jonathan V Sweedler, W. F. Gilly

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Most species within the genus Conus are considered to be specialists in their consumption of prey, typically feeding on molluscs, vermiform invertebrates or fish, and employ peptide toxins to immobilize prey. Conus californicus Hinds 1844 atypically utilizes a wide range of food sources from all three groups. Using DNA- and protein-based methods, we analyzed the molecular diversity of C. californicus toxins and detected a correspondingly large number of conotoxin types. We identified cDNAs corresponding to seven known cysteine-frameworks containing over 40 individual inferred peptides. Additionally, we found a new framework (22) with six predicted peptide examples, along with two forms of a new peptide type of unusual length. Analysis of leader sequences allowed assignment to known superfamilies in only half of the cases, and several of these showed a framework that was not in congruence with the identified superfamily. Mass spectrometric examination of chromatographic fractions from whole venom served to identify peptides corresponding to a number of cDNAs, in several cases differing in their degree of posttranslational modification. This suggests differential or incomplete biochemical processing of these peptides. In general, it is difficult to fit conotoxins from C. californicus into established toxin classification schemes. We hypothesize that the novel structural modifications of individual peptides and their encoding genes reflect evolutionary adaptation to prey species of an unusually wide range as well as the large phylogenetic distance between C. californicus and Indo-Pacific species.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-322
Number of pages12
JournalToxicon
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2011

Fingerprint

Conotoxins
History
Peptides
Complementary DNA
Molluscs
Gene encoding
Mollusca
Venoms
Invertebrates
Post Translational Protein Processing
Fish
Cysteine
Sequence Analysis
Fishes
Food
DNA
Processing

Keywords

  • C. californicus
  • CDNA library
  • Conotoxins
  • Feeding diversity
  • RT-PCR
  • Signal peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Toxicology

Cite this

Diversity of conotoxin types from Conus californicus reflects a diversity of prey types and a novel evolutionary history. / Elliger, C. A.; Richmond, T. A.; Lebaric, Z. N.; Pierce, N. T.; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Gilly, W. F.

In: Toxicon, Vol. 57, No. 2, 01.02.2011, p. 311-322.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Elliger, C. A. ; Richmond, T. A. ; Lebaric, Z. N. ; Pierce, N. T. ; Sweedler, Jonathan V ; Gilly, W. F. / Diversity of conotoxin types from Conus californicus reflects a diversity of prey types and a novel evolutionary history. In: Toxicon. 2011 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 311-322.
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