Diversity in stomatal function is integral to modelling plant carbon and water fluxes

Kevin J. Wolz, Timothy M. Wertin, Mark Abordo, Dan Wang, Andrew D.B. Leakey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Stomatal pores on leaf surfaces respond to environmental and physiological signals to regulate leaf gas exchange. Mathematical models can predict stomatal conductance (g s), with one parameter (m or g l) reflecting the sensitivity of g s to the photosynthetic rate (A), atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration and atmospheric humidity, and a second parameter (g 0) representing the minimum g s. Such models are solved iteratively with a photosynthesis model to form the core of many models of crop or ecosystem carbon and water fluxes. For three decades, g s models have frequently been used assuming fixed parameter values for m or g 1 and g 0 across species and major plant functional types. This study of temperate tree species reveals significant interspecific variation in stomatal function. Applying species-specific parameterizations substantially reduced error in model predictions of g s by 34 to 64% and A by 52 to 60% and resulted in significant correlation between modelled and measured values. This work challenges the long-held assumption of fixed parameter values and, in doing so, suggests an approach for reducing modelling error across a wide range of ecological and agricultural applications.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1292-1298
Number of pages7
JournalNature Ecology and Evolution
Volume1
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Ecology

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Diversity in stomatal function is integral to modelling plant carbon and water fluxes'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this