Abstract

Projected index computed tomography (PICT) is a newly developed technique that uses the measured optical path length from multiple optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans through a semitransparent sample to computationally reconstruct tomographic images based on the spatial variations of the refractive index. Since the index of refraction of most samples is not constant, a depth-wise distortion due to the varying index of the sample is evident. Using a highly reflective reference surface placed behind the sample, optical path length measurements yield an aggregate index value for each beampath through the sample. Rotating the sample allows a data set to be formed for multiple beam angles. These data can be understood as the projections of the object index, i.e. the Radon transform of the index of the object. Using filtered backprojection algorithms sets of projection data were used to reconstruct PICT images. The resulting images are free from the spatial distortions found in standard OCT. Experimental results show that PICT images correspond well with the dimensional characteristics of specific samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)109-114
Number of pages6
JournalProceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering
Volume4956
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 5 2003
EventPROGRESS IN BIOMEDICAL OPTICS AND IMAGING: Coherence Domain Optical Methods and Optical Coherence Tomography in Biomedicine VII - San Jose, CA, United States
Duration: Jan 27 2003Jan 29 2003

Fingerprint

Computed Tomography
Tomography
tomography
Optical tomography
Imaging
Imaging techniques
Radon
Refraction
Optical Coherence Tomography
Refractive index
Path Length
optical paths
projection
Projection
Filtered Backprojection
Radon Transform
radon
Refractive Index
refraction
Rotating

Keywords

  • Distortion
  • Index of refraction
  • Optical coherence tomography
  • Tomography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electronic, Optical and Magnetic Materials
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Computer Science Applications
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

Cite this

Distortion corrected imaging using projected index computed tomography. / Zysk, Adam M.; Reynolds, J. Joshua; Marks, Daniel L.; Carney, P. Scott; Boppart, Stephen A.

In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering, Vol. 4956, 05.12.2003, p. 109-114.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Zysk, Adam M. ; Reynolds, J. Joshua ; Marks, Daniel L. ; Carney, P. Scott ; Boppart, Stephen A. / Distortion corrected imaging using projected index computed tomography. In: Proceedings of SPIE - The International Society for Optical Engineering. 2003 ; Vol. 4956. pp. 109-114.
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