Distinguishing scientific knowledge: The impact of different measures of knowledge on genetically modified food attitudes

Kathleen M. Rose, Emily L. Howell, Leona Y.F. Su, Michael A. Xenos, Dominique Brossard, Dietram A. Scheufele

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

The impact of knowledge on public attitudes toward scientific issues remains unclear, due in part to ill-defined differences in how research designs conceptualize knowledge. Using genetically modified foods as a framework, we explore the impacts of perceived familiarity and factual knowledge, and the moderating roles of media attention and a food-specific attitudinal variable (food consciousness), in shaping these relationships. Based on the differential effects on “negative attitudes” toward genetically modified foods, we provide further evidence that the measures of knowledge are separate concepts and argue against a one-dimensional view of scientific knowledge. We discuss implications for understanding the relationship between knowledge and science attitudes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)449-467
Number of pages19
JournalPublic Understanding of Science
Volume28
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2019

Keywords

  • genetically modified food
  • genetically modified organisms
  • knowledge
  • science attitudes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Communication
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

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