Dislocation mediated continuum plasticity: Case studies on modeling scale dependence, scale-invariance, and directionality of sharp yield-point

Claude Fressengeas, A. Acharya, A. J. Beaudoin

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Plasticity of crystalline solids is a dynamic phenomenon resulting from the motion under stress of linear crystal defects known as dislocations. Such a statement is grounded on numerous convincing observations, and it is widely accepted by the scientific community. Nevertheless, the conventional plasticity theories use macroscopic variables whose definition does not involve the notion of dislocation. This paradoxical situation arises from the enormous range covered by the length scales involved in the description of plasticity, from materials science to engineering. Itmay have seemed impossible to account for the astounding complexity of the (microscopic) dynamics of dislocation ensembles at the (macroscopic) scale of the mechanical properties of materials. Justifications offered for such a simplification usually reside in perfect disorder assumptions. Namely, plastic strain is regarded as resulting from a large number of randomly distributed elementary dislocation glide events, showing no order whatsoever at intermediate length scales. Hence, deriving the mechanical properties from the interactions of dislocations with defects simply requires averaging on any space and time domain. The existence of grain boundaries in polycrystals is of course affecting this averaging procedure, but it does not change it fundamentally.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationComputational Methods for Microstructure-Property Relationships
PublisherSpringer
Pages277-309
Number of pages33
ISBN (Print)9781441906427
DOIs
StatePublished - 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Engineering(all)

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