Directed Irradiation Synthesis as an Advanced Plasma Technology for Surface Modification to Activate Porous and “as-received” Titanium Surfaces

Ana Civantos, Jean Paul Allain, Juan Jose Pavón, Akshath Shetty, Osman El-atwani, Emily Walker, Sandra L. Arias, Emily Gordon, José A. Rodríguez-ortiz, Mike Chen, Yadir Torres

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

For the design of smart titanium implants, it is essential to balance the surface properties without any detrimental effect on the bulk properties of the material. Therefore, in this study, an irradiation-driven surface modification called directed irradiation synthesis (DIS) has been developed to nanopattern porous and “as-received” c.p. Ti surfaces with the aim of improving cellular viability. Nanofeatures were developed using singly-charged argon ions at 0.5 and 1.0 keV energies, incident angles from 0° to 75° degrees, and fluences up to 5.0 × 1017 cm−2. Irradiated surfaces were evaluated by scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy and contact angle, observing an increased hydrophilicity (a contact angle reduction of 73.4% and 49.3%) and a higher roughness on both surfaces except for higher incident angles, which showed the smoothest surface. In-vitro studies demonstrated the biocompatibility of directed irradiation synthesis (DIS) reaching 84% and 87% cell viability levels at 1 and 7 days respectively, and a lower percentage of damaged DNA in tail compared to the control c.p. Ti. All these results confirm the potential of the DIS technique to modify complex surfaces at the nanoscale level promoting their biological performance.
Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number1349
JournalMetals
Volume9
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 15 2019

Keywords

  • surface activation
  • directed irradiation synthesis (DIS)
  • porous titanium
  • "as-received" titanium
  • cell viability
  • bone implant

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    Civantos, A., Allain, J. P., Pavón, J. J., Shetty, A., El-atwani, O., Walker, E., Arias, S. L., Gordon, E., Rodríguez-ortiz, J. A., Chen, M., & Torres, Y. (2019). Directed Irradiation Synthesis as an Advanced Plasma Technology for Surface Modification to Activate Porous and “as-received” Titanium Surfaces. Metals, 9(12), [1349]. https://doi.org/10.3390/met9121349