Directed colloidal assembly

Printing with magnets

Changqian Yu, Jie Zhang, Steve Granick

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Abstract

Bartosz Grzybowski and collaborators investigated how to print a spectrum of colloidal objects, polymeric particles, silica particles, even live bacteria, suspended in a paramagnetic fluid. By using magnetic-field microgradients produced by metal grids embedded in a rubber layer a few hundreds of nanometers thick that is placed on a permanent magnet, the authors show that beautiful arrays of complex microstructures can be assembled with high yield over square centimeter areas. Grzybowski and co-authors refer to this assembly approach as 'magnetic molding' because solutions of paramagnetic salts regulate the response of the colloids to the magnetic fields; the solution becomes in fact part of the mould. Magnetic-mould techniques could potentially enable 3D printing of colloidal structures. The magnetic-template principle put to practice by Grzybowski and colleagues could be generalized to provide programmability and reconfigurability on demand.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)8-9
Number of pages2
JournalNature Materials
Volume13
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

printing
Magnets
Printing
magnets
assembly
Magnetic fields
Rubber
Colloids
rubber
magnetic fields
permanent magnets
Molding
Silicon Dioxide
bacteria
Permanent magnets
colloids
Bacteria
templates
Salts
Metals

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Materials Science(all)
  • Condensed Matter Physics
  • Mechanics of Materials
  • Mechanical Engineering

Cite this

Directed colloidal assembly : Printing with magnets. / Yu, Changqian; Zhang, Jie; Granick, Steve.

In: Nature Materials, Vol. 13, No. 1, 01.01.2014, p. 8-9.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Yu, C, Zhang, J & Granick, S 2014, 'Directed colloidal assembly: Printing with magnets', Nature Materials, vol. 13, no. 1, pp. 8-9. https://doi.org/10.1038/nmat3845
Yu, Changqian ; Zhang, Jie ; Granick, Steve. / Directed colloidal assembly : Printing with magnets. In: Nature Materials. 2014 ; Vol. 13, No. 1. pp. 8-9.
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