Abstract

Mammalian plasma membrane proteins make up the largest class of drug targets yet are difficult to study in a cell free system because of their intransigent nature. Herein, we perform direct encapsulation of plasma membrane proteins derived from mammalian cells into a functional nanodisc library. Peptide fingerprinting was used to analyze the proteome of the incorporated proteins in nanodiscs and to further demonstrate that the lipid composition of the nanodiscs directly affects the class of protein that is incorporated. Furthermore, the functionality of the incorporated membrane proteome was evaluated by measuring the activity of membrane proteins: Na+/K+-ATPase and receptor tyrosine kinases. This work is the first report of the successful establishment and characterization of a cell free functional library of mammalian membrane proteins into nanodiscs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)6299-6302
Number of pages4
JournalBiochemistry
Volume54
Issue number41
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 20 2015

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Cell membranes
Membrane Proteins
Cell Membrane
Proteome
Blood Proteins
Proteins
Peptide Mapping
Cell-Free System
Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases
Encapsulation
Libraries
Adenosine Triphosphatases
Cells
Membranes
Lipids
Peptides
Chemical analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry

Cite this

Direct Capture of Functional Proteins from Mammalian Plasma Membranes into Nanodiscs. / Roy, Jahnabi; Pondenis, Holly; Fan, Timothy M; Das, Aditi.

In: Biochemistry, Vol. 54, No. 41, 20.10.2015, p. 6299-6302.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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