Digging into gPS integrity: Charting the evolution of signal-in-space performance by data mining 400,000,000 navigation messages

Liang Heng, Grace Xingxin Gao, Todd Walter, Per Enge

Research output: Contribution to specialist publicationArticle

Abstract

The GPS Control Segment routinely generates navigation message data on the basis of a prediction model and the measurements at more than a dozen monitor stations. The differences between the broadcast ephemerides/clocks and the truth account for signal-in-space (SIS) errors. Receiver autonomous integrity monitoring (RAIM) or advanced RAIM is a promising tool to protect stand-alone users from such hazards; however, most RAIM algorithms assume at most one satellite fault at a time. Specifically, SIS URE includes satellite ephemeris and clock errors, satellite antenna performance variations, and signal imperfections, but not ionospheric or tropospheric delay, multipath, or any errors due to user receivers. The last step is computing worst-case SIS UREs as well as determining potential SIS anomalies. The validated navigation messages prepared in the second step are used to propagate broadcast orbits/clocks at 15-minute intervals that coincide with the precise ones.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages44-49
Number of pages6
Volume22
No11
Specialist publicationGPS World
StatePublished - Nov 2011

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

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