Differential power processing architecture for increased energy production and reliability of photovoltaic systems

Pradeep S. Shenoy, Brian Johnson, Philip T Krein

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Conventional energy conversion architectures in photovoltaic (PV) systems are often forced to trade off conversion efficiency and power production. This paper introduces a power processing architecture that enables each PV element to operate at its maximum power point (MPP) while only processing a small fraction of the total power produced. This is accomplished by providing only the mismatch in the MPP current of a set of series-connected PV elements. The differential power processing architecture increases overall conversion efficiency and overcomes the challenges of unmatched MPPs (due to partial shading, damage, manufacturing tolerances, etc.). Local control of the differential converters enables distributed protection and monitoring. The reliability analysis included in this paper shows significantly increased overall system reliability. Simulation and experimental results are included to demonstrate the benefits of this approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAPEC 2012 - 27th Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition
Pages1987-1994
Number of pages8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 30 2012
Event27th Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, APEC 2012 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Feb 5 2012Feb 9 2012

Publication series

NameConference Proceedings - IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition - APEC

Other

Other27th Annual IEEE Applied Power Electronics Conference and Exposition, APEC 2012
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period2/5/122/9/12

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Electrical and Electronic Engineering

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