Differential parasitism of macrolepidopteran herbivores on two deciduous tree species

P. Barbosa, A. E. Segarra, P. Gross, A. Caldas, K. Ahlstrom, R. W. Carlson, D. C. Ferguson, E. E. Grissell, R. W. Hodges, P. M. Marsh, R. W. Poole, M. E. Schauff, S. R. Shaw, J. B. Whitfield, N. E. Woodley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Patterns of larval parasitism among species in the macrolepidopteran assemblages on two riparian tree species, Acer negundo L. (box elder) and Salix nigra (Marsh) (black willow) were examined. Larvae were collected throughout the growing season for five years and reared for parasitoid emergence. Total parasitism of larvae on box elder was significantly higher than that of larvae on black willow. Comparisons of parasitism levels among lepidopteran families showed that in five of seven families larval parasitism on box elder was significantly higher than on black willow. For species whose larvae were found on both tree species, total parasitism was significantly higher when the larvae were on box elder than when larvae of the same species were on black willow. In comparisons of species found on both tree species, larvae in three of seven families suffered significantly higher levels of parasitism when on box elder than when on black willow. The roles of the functional/numerical responses of parasitoids, common and numerically dominant parasitoid species, and plant volatiles are considered as causal mechanisms underlying differential parasitism but are not supported by the data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)698-704
Number of pages7
JournalEcology
Volume82
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Acer negundo
  • Black willow
  • Box elder
  • Differential parasitism
  • Insect assemblages
  • Lepidoptera
  • Macrolepidoptera
  • Niche-specificity
  • Parasitoids
  • Plant influences on parasitism
  • Salix nigra

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics

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  • Cite this

    Barbosa, P., Segarra, A. E., Gross, P., Caldas, A., Ahlstrom, K., Carlson, R. W., Ferguson, D. C., Grissell, E. E., Hodges, R. W., Marsh, P. M., Poole, R. W., Schauff, M. E., Shaw, S. R., Whitfield, J. B., & Woodley, N. E. (2001). Differential parasitism of macrolepidopteran herbivores on two deciduous tree species. Ecology, 82(3), 698-704. https://doi.org/10.1890/0012-9658(2001)082[0698:DPOMHO]2.0.CO;2