Differences in sentence complexity in the text of children’s picture books and child-directed speech

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Reading picture books to pre-literate children is associated with improved language outcomes, but the causal pathways of this relationship are not well understood. The present analyses focus on several syntactic differences between the text of children’s picture books and typical child-directed speech, with the aim of understanding ways in which picture book text may systematically differ from typical child-directed speech. The analyses show that picture books contain more rare and complex sentence types, including passive sentences and sentences containing relative clauses, than does child-directed speech. These differences in the patterns of language contained in picture books and typical child-directed speech suggest that one important means by which picture book reading may come to be associated with improved language outcomes is by providing children with types of complex language that might be otherwise rare in their input.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)527-546
Number of pages20
JournalFirst Language
Volume39
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2019

Fingerprint

language
Child-directed Speech
Picture Books
present
Language
Relative Clauses
Pathway
Complex Sentences
Passive Sentences
Causal
Complex Language
Sentence Type
Book Reading
Syntax

Keywords

  • Corpus analysis
  • language development
  • passives
  • picture books
  • relative clauses

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Education
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Differences in sentence complexity in the text of children’s picture books and child-directed speech. / Montag, Jessica L.

In: First Language, Vol. 39, No. 5, 01.10.2019, p. 527-546.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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