Dietary guidance for lutein: consideration for intake recommendations is scientifically supported

Katherine M. Ranard, Sookyoung Jeon, Emily S. Mohn, James C. Griffiths, Elizabeth J. Johnson, John W. Erdman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Lutein, a yellow xanthophyll carotenoid found in egg yolks and many colorful fruits and vegetables, has gained public health interest for its putative role in visual performance and reducing the risk of age-related macular degeneration. The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine’s recommended Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) focus on preventing deficiency and toxicity, but there is a budding interest in establishing DRI-like guidelines for non-essential bioactives, like lutein, that promote optimal health and/or prevent chronic diseases. Lupton et al. developed a set of nine criteria to determine whether a bioactive is ready to be considered for DRI-like recommendations. These criteria include: (1) an accepted definition; (2) a reliable analysis method; (3) a food database with known amounts of the bioactive; (4) cohort studies; (5) clinical trials on metabolic processes; (6) clinical trials for dose–response and efficacy; (7) safety data; (8) systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses; (9) a plausible biological rationale. Based on a review of the literature supporting these criteria, lutein is ready to be considered for intake recommendations. Establishing dietary guidance for lutein would encourage the consumption of lutein-containing foods and raise public awareness about its potential health benefits.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)37-42
Number of pages6
JournalEuropean Journal of Nutrition
Volume56
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2017

Keywords

  • Bioactives
  • Intake recommendations
  • Lutein
  • Macular degeneration
  • Visual performance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

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