Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal

Fabricio J.B. Francischini, Erick M.G. Cordeiro, Jaqueline B. de Campos, Alessandro Alves-Pereira, João Paulo Gomes Viana, Xing Wu, Wei Wei, Patrick Brown, Andrea Joyce, Gabriela Murua, Sofia Fogliata, Steven J Clough, Maria I. Zucchi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The sugarcane borer moth, Diatraea saccharalis, is one of the most important pests of sugarcane and maize crops in the Western Hemisphere. The pest is widespread throughout South and Central America, the Caribbean region and the southern United States. One of the most intriguing features of D. saccharalis population dynamics is the high rate of range expansion reported in recent years. To shed light on the history of colonization of D. saccharalis, we investigated the genetic structure and diversity in American populations using single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs) markers throughout the genome and sequences of the mitochondrial gene cytochrome oxidase (COI). Our primary goal was to propose possible dispersal routes from the putative center of origin that can explain the spatial pattern of genetic diversity. Our findings showed a clear correspondence between genetic structure and the geographical distributions of this pest insect on the American continents. The clustering analyses indicated three distinct groups: one composed of Brazilian populations, a second group composed of populations from El Salvador, Mexico, Texas and Louisiana and a third group composed of the Florida population. The predicted time of divergence predates the agriculture expansion period, but the pattern of distribution of haplotype diversity suggests that human-mediated movement was most likely the factor responsible for the widespread distribution in the Americas. The study of the early history of D. saccharalis promotes a better understanding of range expansion, the history of invasion, and demographic patterns of pest populations in the Americas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0220031
JournalPloS one
Volume14
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

Fingerprint

Diatraea saccharalis
History
Saccharum
Genetic Structures
Genes
Population
Geographical distribution
pests
Population dynamics
El Salvador
history
Electron Transport Complex IV
Prednisolone
Polymorphism
Central America
Agriculture
Crops
Mitochondrial Genes
Moths
South America

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Francischini, F. J. B., Cordeiro, E. M. G., de Campos, J. B., Alves-Pereira, A., Gomes Viana, J. P., Wu, X., ... Zucchi, M. I. (2019). Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal. PloS one, 14(7), [e0220031]. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220031

Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal. / Francischini, Fabricio J.B.; Cordeiro, Erick M.G.; de Campos, Jaqueline B.; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro; Gomes Viana, João Paulo; Wu, Xing; Wei, Wei; Brown, Patrick; Joyce, Andrea; Murua, Gabriela; Fogliata, Sofia; Clough, Steven J; Zucchi, Maria I.

In: PloS one, Vol. 14, No. 7, e0220031, 01.01.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Francischini, FJB, Cordeiro, EMG, de Campos, JB, Alves-Pereira, A, Gomes Viana, JP, Wu, X, Wei, W, Brown, P, Joyce, A, Murua, G, Fogliata, S, Clough, SJ & Zucchi, MI 2019, 'Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal', PloS one, vol. 14, no. 7, e0220031. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220031
Francischini FJB, Cordeiro EMG, de Campos JB, Alves-Pereira A, Gomes Viana JP, Wu X et al. Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal. PloS one. 2019 Jan 1;14(7). e0220031. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0220031
Francischini, Fabricio J.B. ; Cordeiro, Erick M.G. ; de Campos, Jaqueline B. ; Alves-Pereira, Alessandro ; Gomes Viana, João Paulo ; Wu, Xing ; Wei, Wei ; Brown, Patrick ; Joyce, Andrea ; Murua, Gabriela ; Fogliata, Sofia ; Clough, Steven J ; Zucchi, Maria I. / Diatraea saccharalis history of colonization in the Americas. The case for human-mediated dispersal. In: PloS one. 2019 ; Vol. 14, No. 7.
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