Diaspora literacies: An exploration of what reading means to young African immigrant women

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This research study explored two young African immigrant women English learners' perspectives on reading, and literacy more broadly, in relation to motivation and identity during a year-long qualitative study at a large, urban high school in the U.S. southeast. Data were collected through interviews and observations that focused on reading practices and preferences in relation to gender, immigration, and school performance. Findings reveal that while learning to read in a new language these students were simultaneously developing literacy in their first languages through autonomous reading practices, including reading native-language texts, and on-line news sources. Findings also suggest that scaffolding autonomous reading may be one way to help newly arrived English learners develop academic and social literacy and foster a sense of belonging in their new communities. Free author podcast

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)641-649
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Adolescent and Adult Literacy
Volume58
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 2015

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diaspora
immigrant
literacy
language
learning to read
school
immigration
news
gender
interview
community
performance
student

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education

Cite this

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abstract = "This research study explored two young African immigrant women English learners' perspectives on reading, and literacy more broadly, in relation to motivation and identity during a year-long qualitative study at a large, urban high school in the U.S. southeast. Data were collected through interviews and observations that focused on reading practices and preferences in relation to gender, immigration, and school performance. Findings reveal that while learning to read in a new language these students were simultaneously developing literacy in their first languages through autonomous reading practices, including reading native-language texts, and on-line news sources. Findings also suggest that scaffolding autonomous reading may be one way to help newly arrived English learners develop academic and social literacy and foster a sense of belonging in their new communities. Free author podcast",
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