Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties

Chi Wen Lung, Tse Yu Cheng, Yi Jhen Li, Ben Yi Liau, Yih Kuen Jan

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The pneumatic compression system has demonstrated the potential to manage hypertrophic scar tissues using localized intermittent compressive forces. The underlying mechanism associated with these repeated, intermittent compressive forces is the remodeling capacity of collagen fibers of fibrous tissues in response to mechanical forces. Although intermittent compressive forces are clinically proven effective on managing hypertrophic scar, the optimal configurations of pressures and timing of intermittent compressive forces are largely unknown. In this study, we have developed a motor-driven ultrasound indentation system to apply programmable compressive forces and simultaneously assess soft tissue mechanical properties and responses. We further tested this system in various conditions with Institutional Review Board-approved protocols in human participants. The compressive force applied by the system was 40 mmHg on the skin of the forearm for 1 h with a frequency of 0.1 Hz. Soft tissue mechanical properties were assessed at three conditions, including (a) the forearm resting on the table with the wrist at a neutral position, (b) the forearm resting on the table with the wrist at 90° of extension or the maximal extension of the subject, and (c) forearm resting on the table with the hand holding a 1 kg weight. The effective Young’s modulus was calculated to characterize mechanical properties of forearm soft tissues. Before the 1 h intermittent compression treatment, effective Young’s modulus of conditions a, b, and c was 18.0, 11.3, and 16.8 kPa, respectively. After the treatment, the effective Young’s modulus of conditions a, b, and c was reduced by 13, 7, and 51%, respectively. The results support our general hypothesis that intermittent compression therapy may modulate soft tissue properties (e.g. hypertrophic scar). Future work should investigate the long-term effect of intermittent compression therapy on modulating soft tissue properties in patients with hypertrophic scars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationAdvances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016
EditorsNancy Lightner, Vincent G. Duffy
PublisherSpringer-Verlag
Pages317-325
Number of pages9
ISBN (Print)9783319416519
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017
EventInternational Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016 - Walt Disney World, United States
Duration: Jul 27 2016Jul 31 2016

Publication series

NameAdvances in Intelligent Systems and Computing
Volume482
ISSN (Print)2194-5357

Other

OtherInternational Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016
CountryUnited States
CityWalt Disney World
Period7/27/167/31/16

Fingerprint

Pneumatics
Compaction
Tissue
Mechanical properties
Elastic moduli
Indentation
Collagen
Skin
Ultrasonics
Fibers

Keywords

  • Intermittent pneumatic compression system
  • Massage therapy
  • Scar
  • Soft tissue interface

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Control and Systems Engineering
  • Computer Science(all)

Cite this

Lung, C. W., Cheng, T. Y., Li, Y. J., Liau, B. Y., & Jan, Y. K. (2017). Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties. In N. Lightner, & V. G. Duffy (Eds.), Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016 (pp. 317-325). (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 482). Springer-Verlag. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41652-6_30

Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties. / Lung, Chi Wen; Cheng, Tse Yu; Li, Yi Jhen; Liau, Ben Yi; Jan, Yih Kuen.

Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016. ed. / Nancy Lightner; Vincent G. Duffy. Springer-Verlag, 2017. p. 317-325 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing; Vol. 482).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Lung, CW, Cheng, TY, Li, YJ, Liau, BY & Jan, YK 2017, Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties. in N Lightner & VG Duffy (eds), Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016. Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing, vol. 482, Springer-Verlag, pp. 317-325, International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016, Walt Disney World, United States, 7/27/16. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41652-6_30
Lung CW, Cheng TY, Li YJ, Liau BY, Jan YK. Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties. In Lightner N, Duffy VG, editors, Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016. Springer-Verlag. 2017. p. 317-325. (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing). https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-319-41652-6_30
Lung, Chi Wen ; Cheng, Tse Yu ; Li, Yi Jhen ; Liau, Ben Yi ; Jan, Yih Kuen. / Development of an intermittent pneumatic compression system to manage soft tissue mechanical properties. Advances in Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare - Proceedings of the AHFE International Conference on Human Factors and Ergonomics in Healthcare, 2016. editor / Nancy Lightner ; Vincent G. Duffy. Springer-Verlag, 2017. pp. 317-325 (Advances in Intelligent Systems and Computing).
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