Determination of the minimum temperature required for selective photothermal destruction of cancer cells with the use of immunotargeted gold nanoparticles

Xiaohua Huang, Prashant Jain, Ivan H. El-Sayed, Mostafa A. El-Sayed

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Laser photothermal therapy of cancer with the use of gold nanoparticles immunotargeted to molecular markers on the cell surface has been shown to be an effective modality to selectively kill cancer cells at much lower laser powers than those needed for healthy cells. To elucidate the minimum light dosimetry required to induce cell death, photothermal destruction of two cancerous cell lines and a noncancerous cell line treated with antiepidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibody-conjugated gold nanoparticles is studied, and a numerical heat transport model is used to estimate the local temperature rise within the cells as a result of the laser heating of the gold nanoparticles. It is found that cell samples with higher nanoparticle loading require a lower incident laser power to achieve a certain temperature rise. Numerically estimated temperatures of 70-80°C achieved by heating the gold particles agree well with the measured threshold temperature for destruction of the cell lines by oven heating and those measured in an earlier nanoshell method. Specific binding of anti-EGFR antibody to cancerous cells overexpressing EGFR selectively increases the gold nanoparticle loading within cancerous cells, thus allowing the cancerous cells to be destroyed at lower laser power thresholds than needed for the noncancerous cells. In addition, photothermal therapy using gold nanoparticles requires lower laser power thresholds than therapies using conventional dyes due to the much higher absorption coefficient of the gold nanoparticles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)412-417
Number of pages6
JournalPhotochemistry and Photobiology
Volume82
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006
Externally publishedYes

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Gold
Nanoparticles
destruction
cancer
Cells
gold
nanoparticles
Temperature
cells
Lasers
Neoplasms
cultured cells
Growth Factor Receptors
therapy
Heating
temperature
lasers
antibodies
thresholds
Cell Line

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Physical and Theoretical Chemistry

Cite this

Determination of the minimum temperature required for selective photothermal destruction of cancer cells with the use of immunotargeted gold nanoparticles. / Huang, Xiaohua; Jain, Prashant; El-Sayed, Ivan H.; El-Sayed, Mostafa A.

In: Photochemistry and Photobiology, Vol. 82, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 412-417.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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