Determinants of virulence and in vitro development colocalize on a genetic map of setosphaeria turcica

Santiago X. Mideros, Chia Lin Chung, Tyr Wiesner-Hanks, Jesse A. Poland, Dongliang Wu, Ariel A. Fialko, B. Gillian Turgeon, Rebecca J. Nelson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Generating effective and stable strategies for resistance breeding requires an understanding of the genetics of host-pathogen interactions and the implications for pathogen dynamics and evolution. Setosphaeria turcica causes northern leaf blight (NLB), an important disease of maize for which major resistance genes have been deployed. Little is known about the evolutionary dynamics of avirulence (AVR) genes in S. Turcica. To test the hypothesis that there is a genetic association between avirulence and in vitro development traits, we (i) created a genetic map of S. Turcica, (ii) located candidate AVRHt1 and AVRHt2 regions, and (iii) identified genetic regions associated with several in vitro development traits. A cross was generated between a race 1 and a race 23N strain, and 221 progeny were isolated. Genotyping by sequencing was used to score 2, 078 single-nucleotide polymorphism markers. A genetic map spanning 1, 981 centimorgans was constructed, consisting of 21 linkage groups. Genetic mapping extended prior evidence for the location and identity of the AVRHt1 gene and identified a region of interest for AVRHt2. The genetic location of AVRHt2 colocalized with loci influencing radial growth and mycelial abundance. Our data suggest a trade-off between virulence on Ht1 and Ht2 and the pathogen's vegetative growth rate. In addition, in-depth analysis of the genotypic data suggests the presence of significant duplication in the genome of S. Turcica.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)254-263
Number of pages10
JournalPhytopathology
Volume108
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2018

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Agronomy and Crop Science
  • Plant Science

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