Determinants of newspaper circulation: A Pooled Cross-Sectional Time-Series Study in the United States, 1850–1970

Robert L. Bishop, Katherine Sharma, Richard J. Brazee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

This study offers a new approach to the problem of time-series studies and attempts to set up a model to account for the growth in demand for daily newspapers Using U S data on a state-by-state basis for 1850 to 1970, we have used a marketing approach What conditions were necessary for the survival of a daily newspaper? What conditions were conducive to consolidation? What conditions were a barrier to the adoption of social and technological innovation? The data were grouped into geographic and social regions for analysis, using a special case of generalized least squares Independent variables included price as a proportion of per-capita income, percentage of the work force in nonagricultural labor, education, voting, and urbanization. Price proved the most powerful predictor Corrected R2s range from 22636 (m regions where newspaper growth took place very early or late in the period) to 67543 in the Midwest and Southwest The model will be applied to data from the industrialized countries of Western Europe in later work.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-22
Number of pages20
JournalCommunication Research
Volume7
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1980
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Communication
  • Linguistics and Language

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