Detection and differentiation of live and heat-treated Salmonella enterica serovars inoculated onto chicken breast using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy

R. Davis, Y. Burgula, A. Deering, J. Irudayaraj, B. L. Reuhs, L. J. Mauer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Aims:- To evaluate Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques for detecting, quantifying, and differentiating viable and heat-treated cells of Salmonella enterica serovars from chicken breast.Methods and Results:- Salmonella enterica serovars were captured from inoculated chicken breast by filtration and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) prior to spectral collection using an FT-IR spectrometer and IR microscopy. The detection limits, based on amide II peak area (1589 to 1493-cm-1), for the Filtration-FT-IR and IMS-FT-IR methods were 106 and 104-CFU-g-1, respectively. The bacteria were detectable after 6-h of culture enrichment during a sensitivity experiment with lower initial inoculum of 101-CFU-g-1. Canonical variate analysis differentiated experimental from control spectra at a level of 103-CFU-g-1. Partial least squares models were established for the quantification of Salm. enterica from chicken breast using Filtration-FT-IR (R2-≥-0.95, RMSEC-≤-0.62) and IMS-FT-IR (R2-≥-0.80, RMSEC-≤-1.61) methods. Filtration-FT-IR was also used to detect and quantify live Salm. enterica in the presence of heat-treated cells with R2-=-0.996, and this approach was comparable to the results of a commercial stain (BacLight™; R2-=-0.998). Discriminant and canonical variate analyses of the spectra differentiated live and dead cells of different serovars of Salm. enterica.Conclusions:- FT-IR analysis coupled with separation methods is useful for the rapid detection and differentiation of Salm. enterica separated from chicken.Significance and Impact of the Study:- FT-IR-based methods are faster than traditional microbiological methods and can be used for the detection of live and dead bacteria from complex foods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2019-2031
Number of pages13
JournalJournal of Applied Microbiology
Volume109
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2010
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Salmonella enterica
Fourier Analysis
Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy
Chickens
Breast
Hot Temperature
Immunomagnetic Separation
Bacteria
Serogroup
Least-Squares Analysis
Amides
Limit of Detection
Microscopy
Spectrum Analysis
Coloring Agents
Food

Keywords

  • Chicken breast
  • FT-IR
  • Filtration
  • Live dead differentiation
  • Pathogen detection
  • Salmonella enterica

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology

Cite this

Detection and differentiation of live and heat-treated Salmonella enterica serovars inoculated onto chicken breast using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. / Davis, R.; Burgula, Y.; Deering, A.; Irudayaraj, J.; Reuhs, B. L.; Mauer, L. J.

In: Journal of Applied Microbiology, Vol. 109, No. 6, 01.12.2010, p. 2019-2031.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Deering, A.

AU - Irudayaraj, J.

AU - Reuhs, B. L.

AU - Mauer, L. J.

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AB - Aims:- To evaluate Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) techniques for detecting, quantifying, and differentiating viable and heat-treated cells of Salmonella enterica serovars from chicken breast.Methods and Results:- Salmonella enterica serovars were captured from inoculated chicken breast by filtration and immunomagnetic separation (IMS) prior to spectral collection using an FT-IR spectrometer and IR microscopy. The detection limits, based on amide II peak area (1589 to 1493-cm-1), for the Filtration-FT-IR and IMS-FT-IR methods were 106 and 104-CFU-g-1, respectively. The bacteria were detectable after 6-h of culture enrichment during a sensitivity experiment with lower initial inoculum of 101-CFU-g-1. Canonical variate analysis differentiated experimental from control spectra at a level of 103-CFU-g-1. Partial least squares models were established for the quantification of Salm. enterica from chicken breast using Filtration-FT-IR (R2-≥-0.95, RMSEC-≤-0.62) and IMS-FT-IR (R2-≥-0.80, RMSEC-≤-1.61) methods. Filtration-FT-IR was also used to detect and quantify live Salm. enterica in the presence of heat-treated cells with R2-=-0.996, and this approach was comparable to the results of a commercial stain (BacLight™; R2-=-0.998). Discriminant and canonical variate analyses of the spectra differentiated live and dead cells of different serovars of Salm. enterica.Conclusions:- FT-IR analysis coupled with separation methods is useful for the rapid detection and differentiation of Salm. enterica separated from chicken.Significance and Impact of the Study:- FT-IR-based methods are faster than traditional microbiological methods and can be used for the detection of live and dead bacteria from complex foods.

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KW - Pathogen detection

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