Designing external aids that support older pilot performance

Daniel Morrow, Dervon Chang, Christopher Wickens, Esa Rantanen, Liza Raquel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Communication taxes pilots' cognitive resources. External aids such as note-taking help pilots manage these demands. Morrow et al. (2003) found that note-taking eliminated age differences among pilots on a readback task compared to a no-aid condition. However, we investigated communication-only rather than multi-task environments typical of piloting. The present study compared note-taking (kneepad) with an electronic notepad positioned next to the instrument panel in a flight simulator (epad). The epad may be easier to coordinate with concurrent tasks because it is more integrated with flight instruments. Six older and six younger pilots used these aids to respond to ATC messages in a flight simulator. Readback accuracy was higher when pilots used either aid compared to a no-aid condition. The pattern of results suggested a smaller age difference in the aid than in the no-aid conditions. The results replicate the earlier finding of note-taking benefits and extend them to the novel epad.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 49th Annual Meeting, HFES 2005
PublisherHuman Factors and Ergonomics Society Inc.
Pages186-189
Number of pages4
ISBN (Print)094528926X, 9780945289265
DOIs
StatePublished - 2005
Event49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005 - Orlando, FL, United States
Duration: Sep 26 2005Sep 30 2005

Publication series

NameProceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society
ISSN (Print)1071-1813

Other

Other49th Annual Meeting of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, HFES 2005
CountryUnited States
CityOrlando, FL
Period9/26/059/30/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Human Factors and Ergonomics

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