Design of redundant microvascular cooling networks for blockage tolerance

Stephen J. Pety, Marcus Hwai Yik Tan, Ahmad R. Najafi, Anthony C. Gendusa, Philip R. Barnett, Philippe H Geubelle, Scott R White

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Microvascular networks can provide host materials with many functions including self-healing and active cooling. However, vascular networks are susceptible to blockage which can dramatically reduce their functional performance. A novel optimization scheme is presented to design networks that provide sufficient cooling capacity even when partially blocked. Microvascular polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) panels subject to a 2000 W m−2 applied heat flux and 28.2 mL min−1 coolant flow rate are simulated using dimensionally reduced thermal and hydraulic models and an interface-enriched generalized finite element method (IGFEM). Channel networks are optimized to minimize panel temperature while the channels are either clear (the O0 scheme), subject to the single worst-case blockage (O1), or subject to two worst-case blockages (O2). Designs are optimized with nodal degree (a measure of redundancy) ranging from 2 to 6. The results show that blockage tolerance is greatly enhanced for panels optimized while considering blockages and for panels with higher nodal degree. For example, the 6-degree O1 design only has a temperature rise of 7 °C when a single channel is blocked, compared to a 35 °C rise for the 2-degree O0 design. Thermography experiments on PDMS panels validate the IGFEM solver and the blockage tolerance of optimized panels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)965-976
Number of pages12
JournalApplied Thermal Engineering
Volume131
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 25 2018

Fingerprint

Cooling
Polydimethylsiloxane
Interfaces (computer)
Finite element method
Hydraulic models
Coolants
Redundancy
Heat flux
Flow rate
Temperature
Experiments
Hot Temperature

Keywords

  • Blockage tolerance
  • Microvascular composites
  • Optimization
  • Redundancy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Energy Engineering and Power Technology
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

Cite this

Pety, S. J., Tan, M. H. Y., Najafi, A. R., Gendusa, A. C., Barnett, P. R., Geubelle, P. H., & White, S. R. (2018). Design of redundant microvascular cooling networks for blockage tolerance. Applied Thermal Engineering, 131, 965-976. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.applthermaleng.2017.10.094

Design of redundant microvascular cooling networks for blockage tolerance. / Pety, Stephen J.; Tan, Marcus Hwai Yik; Najafi, Ahmad R.; Gendusa, Anthony C.; Barnett, Philip R.; Geubelle, Philippe H; White, Scott R.

In: Applied Thermal Engineering, Vol. 131, 25.02.2018, p. 965-976.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pety, Stephen J. ; Tan, Marcus Hwai Yik ; Najafi, Ahmad R. ; Gendusa, Anthony C. ; Barnett, Philip R. ; Geubelle, Philippe H ; White, Scott R. / Design of redundant microvascular cooling networks for blockage tolerance. In: Applied Thermal Engineering. 2018 ; Vol. 131. pp. 965-976.
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