Abstract

A methodology is presented for the design of a microfabricated blister-type device to examine the cellular response of isolated cells and multi-cellular aggregates to finite mechanical strains (1-5%):. The proposed device utilizes microfabrication technologies that incorporate the bonding, transfer, and assembly of thin (3 μm < thickness < 100 μm) elastic membranes onto rigid substrates with a circular hole or array of circular holes in the formation of diaphragm structures. An analysis of membrane deformations and strain fields of macro- and micro-scale polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) diaphragm, blister-type devices demonstrates that microfabricated diaphragms can achieve finite strains corresponding to smaller axial displacements than those required for identical strains in macro-scale devices. Smaller axial displacements may decrease the confounding shear loading of the cell culture by the overlying nutrient medium. Additionally, it is shown that the uniform residual stress of a microfabricated diaphragm can be experimentally determined and utilized for more precise control of the incremental finite strains imposed on the diaphragm. Thus, microfabricated blister-type cell straining devices may potentially enhance future quantitative investigations of dynamic mechanically stimulated cell culture.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2nd Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings
EditorsDavid Beebe, Andre Dittmar
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages174-179
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)0780374800, 9780780374805
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2002
Event2nd Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Madison, United States
Duration: May 2 2002May 4 2002

Publication series

Name2nd Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology - Proceedings

Other

Other2nd Annual International IEEE-EMBS Special Topic Conference on Microtechnologies in Medicine and Biology
CountryUnited States
CityMadison
Period5/2/025/4/02

Keywords

  • cellular mechanotransduction
  • mechanostimulus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biotechnology
  • Microbiology (medical)

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