Density currents in the Chicago River, illinois

Carlos M. García, Claudia Manríquez, Kevin Oberg, Marcelo Horacio Garcia

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Bi-directional flow observed in the main branch of the Chicago River is due, in most cases, to density currents generated by density differences between the water in the North Branch Chicago River and the Chicago River. An upward-looking 600-KHz acoustic Doppler current profiler was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in the center line of the Chicago River at Columbus Drive at Chicago, IL, to characterize these flow conditions. Bi-directional flow was observed eight times in January 2004 at Columbus Drive. Three bi-directional flow events, with temperature stratification of approximately 4°C, were also observed on the North Branch Chicago River. Analysis of these data indicates that the plunging point of the density current moves upstream or downstream on the North Branch Chicago River, depending on the density difference. Complementary water-quality and meterologic data from January 2004 help confirm the mechanism causing the formation of the density currents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationRiver, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics
Subtitle of host publicationRCEM 2005 - Proceedings of the 4th IAHR Symposium on River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics
Pages191-201
Number of pages11
StatePublished - Dec 1 2006
Event4th IAHR Symposium on River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics, RCEM 2005 - Urbana, IL, United States
Duration: Oct 4 2005Oct 7 2005

Publication series

NameRiver, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics: RCEM 2005 - Proceedings of the 4th IAHR Symposium on River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics
Volume1

Other

Other4th IAHR Symposium on River, Coastal and Estuarine Morphodynamics, RCEM 2005
CountryUnited States
CityUrbana, IL
Period10/4/0510/7/05

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecological Modeling
  • Environmental Chemistry

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Density currents in the Chicago River, illinois'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this