Democratic Processes and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics

William T Bernhard, David Leblang

Research output: Book/Report/Conference proceedingBook

Abstract

The authors examine the conditions under which democratic events, including elections, cabinet formations, and government dissolutions, affect asset markets. Where these events have less predictable outcomes, market returns are depressed and volatility increases. In contrast, where market actors can forecast the result, returns do not exhibit any unusual behavior. Further, political expectations condition how markets respond to the political process. When news causes market actors to update their political beliefs, market actors reallocate their portfolios, and overall market behavior changes. To measure political information, Professors Bernhard and Leblang employ sophisticated models of the political process. They draw on a variety of models of market behavior, including the efficient markets hypothesis, capital asset pricing model, and arbitrage pricing theory, to trace the impact of political events on currency, stock, and bond markets. The analysis will appeal to academics, graduate students, and advanced undergraduates across political science, economics, and finance.

Original languageEnglish (US)
PublisherCambridge University Press
Number of pages260
ISBN (Electronic)9780511607226
ISBN (Print)9780521861229
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2006

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Democratic Processes and Financial Markets: Pricing Politics'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this