Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents

Jan Kai Chang, M. A.Bashar Emon, Chia Shuo Li, Quansan Yang, Hui Ping Chang, Zijian Yang, Chih I. Wu, M Taher A Saif, John A. Rogers

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Foundry-compatible materials and processing approaches serve as the foundations for advanced, active implantable microsystems that can dissolve in biofluids into biocompatible reaction products, with broad potential applications in biomedicine. The results reported here include in vitro studies of the dissolution kinetics and nanoscale bioresorption behaviors of device-grade thin films of Si, SiNx, SiO2, and W in the presence of dynamic cell cultures via atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In situ investigations of cell-extracellular mechanotransduction induced by cellular traction provide insights into the cytotoxicity of these same materials and of microcomponents formed with them using foundry-compatible processes, indicating potential cytotoxicity elicited by W at concentrations greater than 6 mM. The findings are of central relevance to the biocompatibility of modern Si-based electronics technologies as active, bioresorbable microsystems that interface with living tissues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalACS Nano
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jan 1 2018

Fingerprint

foundries
Microsystems
Foundries
Cytotoxicity
Semiconductor materials
degradation
Degradation
Kinetics
traction
kinetics
biocompatibility
Photoelectron spectroscopy
X ray spectroscopy
Reaction products
Biocompatibility
electronics
Cell culture
reaction products
grade
Atomic force microscopy

Keywords

  • bioresorption
  • cell metabolism
  • cell traction force
  • implantable electronics
  • toxicity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Engineering(all)
  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Chang, J. K., Emon, M. A. B., Li, C. S., Yang, Q., Chang, H. P., Yang, Z., ... Rogers, J. A. (Accepted/In press). Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents. ACS Nano. https://doi.org/10.1021/acsnano.8b04513

Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents. / Chang, Jan Kai; Emon, M. A.Bashar; Li, Chia Shuo; Yang, Quansan; Chang, Hui Ping; Yang, Zijian; Wu, Chih I.; Saif, M Taher A; Rogers, John A.

In: ACS Nano, 01.01.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, Jan Kai ; Emon, M. A.Bashar ; Li, Chia Shuo ; Yang, Quansan ; Chang, Hui Ping ; Yang, Zijian ; Wu, Chih I. ; Saif, M Taher A ; Rogers, John A. / Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents. In: ACS Nano. 2018.
@article{e238e2bd4f4940dea1670999ace2a256,
title = "Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents",
abstract = "Foundry-compatible materials and processing approaches serve as the foundations for advanced, active implantable microsystems that can dissolve in biofluids into biocompatible reaction products, with broad potential applications in biomedicine. The results reported here include in vitro studies of the dissolution kinetics and nanoscale bioresorption behaviors of device-grade thin films of Si, SiNx, SiO2, and W in the presence of dynamic cell cultures via atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In situ investigations of cell-extracellular mechanotransduction induced by cellular traction provide insights into the cytotoxicity of these same materials and of microcomponents formed with them using foundry-compatible processes, indicating potential cytotoxicity elicited by W at concentrations greater than 6 mM. The findings are of central relevance to the biocompatibility of modern Si-based electronics technologies as active, bioresorbable microsystems that interface with living tissues.",
keywords = "bioresorption, cell metabolism, cell traction force, implantable electronics, toxicity",
author = "Chang, {Jan Kai} and Emon, {M. A.Bashar} and Li, {Chia Shuo} and Quansan Yang and Chang, {Hui Ping} and Zijian Yang and Wu, {Chih I.} and Saif, {M Taher A} and Rogers, {John A.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1021/acsnano.8b04513",
language = "English (US)",
journal = "ACS Nano",
issn = "1936-0851",
publisher = "American Chemical Society",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Cytotoxicity and in Vitro Degradation Kinetics of Foundry-Compatible Semiconductor Nanomembranes and Electronic Microcomponents

AU - Chang, Jan Kai

AU - Emon, M. A.Bashar

AU - Li, Chia Shuo

AU - Yang, Quansan

AU - Chang, Hui Ping

AU - Yang, Zijian

AU - Wu, Chih I.

AU - Saif, M Taher A

AU - Rogers, John A.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - Foundry-compatible materials and processing approaches serve as the foundations for advanced, active implantable microsystems that can dissolve in biofluids into biocompatible reaction products, with broad potential applications in biomedicine. The results reported here include in vitro studies of the dissolution kinetics and nanoscale bioresorption behaviors of device-grade thin films of Si, SiNx, SiO2, and W in the presence of dynamic cell cultures via atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In situ investigations of cell-extracellular mechanotransduction induced by cellular traction provide insights into the cytotoxicity of these same materials and of microcomponents formed with them using foundry-compatible processes, indicating potential cytotoxicity elicited by W at concentrations greater than 6 mM. The findings are of central relevance to the biocompatibility of modern Si-based electronics technologies as active, bioresorbable microsystems that interface with living tissues.

AB - Foundry-compatible materials and processing approaches serve as the foundations for advanced, active implantable microsystems that can dissolve in biofluids into biocompatible reaction products, with broad potential applications in biomedicine. The results reported here include in vitro studies of the dissolution kinetics and nanoscale bioresorption behaviors of device-grade thin films of Si, SiNx, SiO2, and W in the presence of dynamic cell cultures via atomic force microscopy and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy. In situ investigations of cell-extracellular mechanotransduction induced by cellular traction provide insights into the cytotoxicity of these same materials and of microcomponents formed with them using foundry-compatible processes, indicating potential cytotoxicity elicited by W at concentrations greater than 6 mM. The findings are of central relevance to the biocompatibility of modern Si-based electronics technologies as active, bioresorbable microsystems that interface with living tissues.

KW - bioresorption

KW - cell metabolism

KW - cell traction force

KW - implantable electronics

KW - toxicity

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85053180147&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85053180147&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1021/acsnano.8b04513

DO - 10.1021/acsnano.8b04513

M3 - Article

C2 - 30160102

AN - SCOPUS:85053180147

JO - ACS Nano

JF - ACS Nano

SN - 1936-0851

ER -