Cyclic experimental behavior of angles and applications for connection design and modeling

J. Nelson, A. Davaran, T. Beland, C. Bradley, E. M. Hines, R. Tremblay, L. A. Fahnestock

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Recent work on the seismic behavior of low-ductility, steel-braced frames has suggested that adding top and seat angles to gravity-framing connections can increase a building's reserve capacity and, hence, its collapse performance. To this end, a comprehensive suite of 133 tests has been developed and is currently in progress to establish a baseline of ultimate capacities under monotonic and cyclic loading. Angles range in size from L4x4x5/16 to L8x6x3/4 and will be fastened using 3/4″ A325, 1″ A325, and 1″ A490 bolts. The distance from the heel of the angle to the bolt centerline in the vertical leg, referred to as the gage, has previously been shown to be an important parameter, particularly in relation to the thickness of the angle. Low gage-to-thickness ratios indicate stocky configurations, while high ratios indicate slender, flexure-controlled configurations. The ratios within this study range from 1.25 to 8.00. Based on the test results, this study aims to develop simple analytical models that can reasonably predict ultimate moment capacities and rotations of beam-to-column connections reinforced with top and seat angles.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationStructures Congress 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Structures Congress
EditorsGlenn R. Bell, Matt A. Card
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers
Pages2381-2392
Number of pages12
ISBN (Electronic)9780784413357
DOIs
StatePublished - 2014
EventStructures Congress 2014 - Boston, United States
Duration: Apr 3 2014Apr 5 2014

Publication series

NameStructures Congress 2014 - Proceedings of the 2014 Structures Congress

Other

OtherStructures Congress 2014
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityBoston
Period4/3/144/5/14

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Building and Construction
  • Civil and Structural Engineering

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