Cyber-Physical Topology Language: Definition, Operations, and Application

Carmen Cheh, Gabriel A. Weaver, William H. Sanders

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Maintaining the resilience of a large-scale system requires an accurate view of the system's cyber and physical state. The ability to collect, organize, and analyze state central to a system's operation is thus important in today's environment, in which the number and sophistication of security attacks are increasing. Although a variety of sensors (e.g., Intrusion Detection Systems, log files, and physical sensors) are available to collect system state information, it's difficult for administrators to maintain and analyze the diversity of information needed to understand a system's security state. Therefore, we have developed the Cyber-Physical Topology Language (CPTL) to represent and reason about system security. CPTL combines ideas from graph theory and formal logics, and provides a framework to capture relationships among the diverse types of sensor information. In this paper, we formally define CPTL as well as operations on CPTL models that can be used to infer a system's security state. We then illustrate the use of CPTL in both the enterprise and electrical power domains and provide experimental results that illustrate the practicality of the approach.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationProceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015
EditorsDong Xiang, Tatsuhiro Tsuchiya, Guojun Wang
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages60-69
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781467393768
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 4 2016
Event21st IEEE Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015 - Zhangjiajie, China
Duration: Nov 18 2015Nov 20 2015

Publication series

NameProceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015

Other

Other21st IEEE Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015
CountryChina
CityZhangjiajie
Period11/18/1511/20/15

Fingerprint

Topology
Security systems
Sensors
Formal logic
Graph theory
Intrusion detection
Large scale systems
Industry

Keywords

  • Cyber-Physical Topology Language
  • description logics
  • graph theory
  • system state
  • target system model

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hardware and Architecture
  • Computer Networks and Communications

Cite this

Cheh, C., Weaver, G. A., & Sanders, W. H. (2016). Cyber-Physical Topology Language: Definition, Operations, and Application. In D. Xiang, T. Tsuchiya, & G. Wang (Eds.), Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015 (pp. 60-69). [7371417] (Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/PRDC.2015.20

Cyber-Physical Topology Language : Definition, Operations, and Application. / Cheh, Carmen; Weaver, Gabriel A.; Sanders, William H.

Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015. ed. / Dong Xiang; Tatsuhiro Tsuchiya; Guojun Wang. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. p. 60-69 7371417 (Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Cheh, C, Weaver, GA & Sanders, WH 2016, Cyber-Physical Topology Language: Definition, Operations, and Application. in D Xiang, T Tsuchiya & G Wang (eds), Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015., 7371417, Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 60-69, 21st IEEE Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015, Zhangjiajie, China, 11/18/15. https://doi.org/10.1109/PRDC.2015.20
Cheh C, Weaver GA, Sanders WH. Cyber-Physical Topology Language: Definition, Operations, and Application. In Xiang D, Tsuchiya T, Wang G, editors, Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2016. p. 60-69. 7371417. (Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015). https://doi.org/10.1109/PRDC.2015.20
Cheh, Carmen ; Weaver, Gabriel A. ; Sanders, William H. / Cyber-Physical Topology Language : Definition, Operations, and Application. Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015. editor / Dong Xiang ; Tatsuhiro Tsuchiya ; Guojun Wang. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2016. pp. 60-69 (Proceedings - 2015 IEEE 21st Pacific Rim International Symposium on Dependable Computing, PRDC 2015).
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