Customization and composition of distributed objects: Middleware abstractions for policy management

Mark Astley, Gul A. Agha

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Current middleware solutions such as CORBA and Java's RMI emphasize compositional design by separating functional aspects of a system (e.g. objects) from the mechanisms used for interaction (e.g. remote procedure call through stubs and skeletons). While this is an effective solution for handling distributed interactions, higher-level requirements such as heterogeneity, availability, and adaptability require policies for resource management as well as interaction. We describe the Distributed Connection Language (DCL): an architecture description language based on the Actor model of distributed objects. System components and the policies which govern an architecture are specified as encapsulated groups of actors. Composition operators are used to build connections between components as well as customize their behavior. This customization is realized using a meta-architecture. We describe the syntax and semantics of DCL, and illustrate the language by way of several examples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages1-9
Number of pages9
StatePublished - Dec 1 1998
EventProceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98 - Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA
Duration: Nov 3 1998Nov 5 1998

Other

OtherProceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98
CityLake Buena Vista, FL, USA
Period11/3/9811/5/98

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Middleware
Common object request broker architecture (CORBA)
Chemical analysis
Semantics
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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Software

Cite this

Astley, M., & Agha, G. A. (1998). Customization and composition of distributed objects: Middleware abstractions for policy management. 1-9. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98, Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA, .

Customization and composition of distributed objects : Middleware abstractions for policy management. / Astley, Mark; Agha, Gul A.

1998. 1-9 Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98, Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA, .

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Astley, M & Agha, GA 1998, 'Customization and composition of distributed objects: Middleware abstractions for policy management', Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98, Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA, 11/3/98 - 11/5/98 pp. 1-9.
Astley M, Agha GA. Customization and composition of distributed objects: Middleware abstractions for policy management. 1998. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98, Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA, .
Astley, Mark ; Agha, Gul A. / Customization and composition of distributed objects : Middleware abstractions for policy management. Paper presented at Proceedings of the 1998 ACM SIGSOFT 6th International Symposium on the Foundations of Software Engineering, FSE-6, SIGSOFT-98, Lake Buena Vista, FL, USA, .9 p.
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