Current issues in heritage language acquisition

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

An increasing trend in many postsecondary foreign language classes in North America is the presence of heritage language learners. Heritage language learners are speakers of ethnolinguistically minority languages who were exposed to the language in the family since childhood and as adults wish to learn, relearn, or improve their current level of linguistic proficiency in their family language. This article discusses the development of the linguistic and grammatical knowledge of heritage language speakers from childhood to adulthood and the conditions under which language learning does or does not occur. Placing heritage language acquisition within current and viable cognitive and linguistic theories of acquisition, I discuss what most recent basic research has so far uncovered about heritage speakers of different languages and their language learning process. I conclude with directions for future research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3-23
Number of pages21
JournalAnnual Review of Applied Linguistics
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2010

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language acquisition
language
linguistics
childhood
Language Acquisition
Heritage Language
basic research
adulthood
foreign language
learning process
minority
Childhood
Language
trend

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Language and Linguistics
  • Linguistics and Language

Cite this

Current issues in heritage language acquisition. / Montrul, Silvina.

In: Annual Review of Applied Linguistics, Vol. 30, 01.03.2010, p. 3-23.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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