Culture, self-construal, and affective reactions to successful and unsuccessful others

Katherine White, Darrin R. Lehman, Dov Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Three studies examined whether cultural background and self-construal predict affective reactions to successful and unsuccessful others. Asian-Canadians and those with more interdependent self-construals had less positive affective reactions to an unsuccessful than a successful other, and less positive affective reactions to an unsuccessful other than did European-Canadians and those with less interdependent self-construals (Study 1). Priming self-construal in a sample of European-Canadians mimicked these cultural differences (Study 2), and this priming effect was moderated by cultural background (Study 3). Asian-Canadians primed with interdependence (but not independence) had less positive affective reactions to an unsuccessful than a successful target, whereas European-Canadians primed with independence (but not interdependence) had more positive affective reactions to an unsuccessful than a successful target.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)582-592
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Experimental Social Psychology
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2006

Keywords

  • Affect
  • Culture
  • Self-construal
  • Social comparison

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology
  • Sociology and Political Science

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