Culture-related differences in default network activity during visuo-spatial judgments

Joshua O S Goh, Andrew C. Hebrank, Bradley P. Sutton, Michael W L Chee, Sam K Y Sim, Denise C. Park

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Studies on culture-related differences in cognition have shown that Westerners attend more to object-related information, whereas East Asians attend more to contextual information. Neural correlates of these different culture-related visual processing styles have been reported in the ventral-visual and fronto-parietal regions. We conducted an fMRI study of East Asians and Westerners on a visuospatial judgment task that involved relative, contextual judgments, which are typically more challenging for Westerners. Participants judged the relative distances between a dot and a line in visual stimuli during task blocks and alternated finger presses during control blocks. Behaviorally, East Asians responded faster than Westerners, reflecting greater ease of the task for East Asians. In response to the greater task difficulty, Westerners showed greater neural engagement compared to East Asians in frontal, parietal, and occipital areas. Moreover, Westerners also showed greater suppression of the default network-a brain network that is suppressed under condition of high cognitive challenge. This study demonstrates for the first time that cultural differences in visual attention during a cognitive task are manifested both by differences in activation in fronto-parietal regions as well as suppression in default regions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)134-142
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience
Volume8
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2013

Keywords

  • Culture
  • Default network
  • fMRI
  • Visuo-spatial processing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology

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