Critical reflections on emancipatory partnerships in transition research: discerning perspectives of New Zealand Students on the autism spectrum

Sarah M. Hart, Janet S. Gaffney, Mary F. Hill

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Transition from school involves different perspectives. Those most silenced in the process are transitioning students with significant disability, and similarly, they are alienated from the conduct of research. In this empirical project, three young men with complex autism conditions in Aotearoa New Zealand reclaimed their position as experts on their own transitions, and moreover, their contributions to research on the subject. Over a six-month ethnography, unique methodological adaptions were used to access personal insights and capabilities through emancipatory partnerships. The research forged collaborations that have the potential to be mirrored in future practices applicable to a transition with dignity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)831-852
Number of pages22
JournalDisability and Society
Volume32
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 3 2017
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Aotearoa New Zealand
  • Emancipatory partnerships
  • capability approach
  • ethnography
  • significant disability
  • transition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • Health Professions(all)
  • Social Sciences(all)

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Critical reflections on emancipatory partnerships in transition research: discerning perspectives of New Zealand Students on the autism spectrum'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this