Critical consciousness in the cross-cultural research space: Reflections from two researchers engaged in collaborative cross-cultural research

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Abstract

Most traditional research approaches emerge from the position that all "good" research is "objective." While this is critical for conducting scholarly inquiry, we contend that it is equally important to acknowledge the significant impact social, cultural, and political contexts have on the research process. That is, research is a malleable process informed and influenced by broader socio-political forces. Because research is not conducted in a vacuum, researchers have a duty to consider the context within which one engages in research. It also requires the researcher to understand their position or status along with their participants' power and expertise when undertaking research studies, particularly in cross-contexts. In this chapter, we explore the nuances - some overt others subtle - that have informed and influenced how our cross-cultural team navigated our research spaces. The authors of this chapter are a cross-cultural team comprised of a White American and a Black African academic. Both the United States and South Africa have complex histories of race relations and racial identity within their broader socio-political context which must be considered when conducting research. Therefore, to dissociate and compartmentalize aspects of our identity when conducting research in these contexts may in fact compromise scholarly insights which might emerge from these contexts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)147-163
Number of pages17
JournalInternational Perspectives on Education and Society
Volume30
DOIs
StatePublished - 2016

Fingerprint

consciousness
research process
research approach
social effects
compromise
expertise
history

Keywords

  • Cross-contexts
  • Cross-cultural research
  • Socio-political context
  • White savior

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Sociology and Political Science

Cite this

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