Cost-Benefit Analysis for Biological Control Programs That Targeted Insect Pests of Eucalypts in Urban Landscapes of California

T. D. Paine, J. G. Millar, Lawrence M Hanks, J. Gould, Q. Wang, K. Daane, D. L. Dahlsten, E. G. McPherson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

As well as being planted for wind breaks, landscape trees, and fuel wood, eucalypts are also widely used as urban street trees in California. They now are besieged by exotic insect herbivores of four different feeding guilds. The objective of the current analysis was to determine the return on investment from biological control programs that have targeted these pests. Independent estimates of the total number of eucalypt street trees in California ranged from a high of 476,527 trees (based on tree inventories from 135 California cities) to a low of 190,666 trees (based on 49 tree inventories). Based on a survey of 3,512 trees, the estimated mean value of an individual eucalypt was US$5,978. Thus, the total value of eucalypt street trees in California ranged from more than US$1.0 billion to more than US$2.8 billion. Biological control programs that targeted pests of eucalypts in California have cost US$2,663,097 in extramural grants and University of California salaries. Consequently, the return derived from protecting the value of this resource through the biological control efforts, per dollar expended, ranged from US$1,070 for the high estimated number of trees to US$428 for the lower estimate. The analyses demonstrate both the tremendous value of urban street trees, and the benefits that stem from successful biological control programs aimed at preserving these trees. Economic analyses such as this, which demonstrate the substantial rates of return from successful biological control of invasive pests, may play a key role in developing both grass-roots and governmental support for future urban biological control efforts.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2498-2504
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of economic entomology
Volume108
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2015

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cost benefit analysis
cost-benefit analysis
biological control
insect pests
insect
street trees
pests
pest
urban landscape
programme
fuelwood
wind break
herbivores
grasses
guild
economics
insects
stems
herbivore
grass

Keywords

  • Eucalyptus
  • classical biological control
  • natural enemy
  • street tree
  • urban landscape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology
  • Insect Science

Cite this

Cost-Benefit Analysis for Biological Control Programs That Targeted Insect Pests of Eucalypts in Urban Landscapes of California. / Paine, T. D.; Millar, J. G.; Hanks, Lawrence M; Gould, J.; Wang, Q.; Daane, K.; Dahlsten, D. L.; McPherson, E. G.

In: Journal of economic entomology, Vol. 108, No. 6, 01.12.2015, p. 2498-2504.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Paine, T. D. ; Millar, J. G. ; Hanks, Lawrence M ; Gould, J. ; Wang, Q. ; Daane, K. ; Dahlsten, D. L. ; McPherson, E. G. / Cost-Benefit Analysis for Biological Control Programs That Targeted Insect Pests of Eucalypts in Urban Landscapes of California. In: Journal of economic entomology. 2015 ; Vol. 108, No. 6. pp. 2498-2504.
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