Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology

Stacie L. Warren, Laura D. Crocker, Jeffrey Martin Spielberg, Anna S. Engels, Marie T. Banich, Bradley P. Sutton, Gregory A. Miller, Wendy Heller

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Individual differences in inhibition-related functions have been implicated as risk factors for a broad range of psychopathology, including anxiety and depression. Delineating neural mechanisms of distinct inhibition-related functions may clarify their role in the development and maintenance of psychopathology. The present study tested the hypothesis that activity in common and distinct brain regions would be associated with an ecologically sensitive, self-report measure of inhibition and a laboratory performance measure of prepotent response inhibition. Results indicated that sub-regions of DLPFC distinguished measures of inhibition, whereas left inferior frontal gyrus and bilateral inferior parietal cortex were associated with both types of inhibition. Additionally, co-occurring anxiety and depression modulated neural activity in select brain regions associated with response inhibition. Results imply that specific combinations of anxiety and depression dimensions are associated with failure to implement top-down attentional control as reflected in inefficient recruitment of posterior DLPFC and increased activation in regions associated with threat (MTG) and worry (BA10). Present findings elucidate possible neural mechanisms of interference that could help explain executive control deficits in psychopathology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalFrontiers in Human Neuroscience
Issue numberMAY
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 2013

Fingerprint

Psychopathology
Anxiety
Depression
Parietal Lobe
Executive Function
Brain
Inhibition (Psychology)
Prefrontal Cortex
Individuality
Self Report
Maintenance

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Attentional control
  • Depression
  • Dlpfc
  • Inhibition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry
  • Behavioral Neuroscience

Cite this

Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology. / Warren, Stacie L.; Crocker, Laura D.; Spielberg, Jeffrey Martin; Engels, Anna S.; Banich, Marie T.; Sutton, Bradley P.; Miller, Gregory A.; Heller, Wendy.

In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, No. MAY, 25.05.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Warren, Stacie L. ; Crocker, Laura D. ; Spielberg, Jeffrey Martin ; Engels, Anna S. ; Banich, Marie T. ; Sutton, Bradley P. ; Miller, Gregory A. ; Heller, Wendy. / Cortical organization of inhibition-related functions and modulation by psychopathology. In: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience. 2013 ; No. MAY.
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