Correlates of Disclosure Cessation After Sexual Assault

Emily R. Dworkin, Nicole E Allen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Contacts with responders after sexual assault may influence further disclosure, but this possibility has not been explored empirically. Thus, this study investigates associations between survivors’ contacts with responders and their decisions to discontinue disclosure. Fifty-four college students with a history of unwanted sexual experiences described 94 ordered contacts with responders. Results indicate that survivors’ perceptions of responsiveness were not associated with continued disclosure, but survivors were more likely to continue disclosing when they perceived more rape myth acceptance from responders and when the assault was more recent. These findings highlight survivors’ tenacity in meeting their needs, even after problematic responses.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)85-100
Number of pages16
JournalViolence Against Women
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018

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Keywords

  • disclosure
  • help seeking
  • rape

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gender Studies
  • Sociology and Political Science
  • Law

Cite this

Correlates of Disclosure Cessation After Sexual Assault. / Dworkin, Emily R.; Allen, Nicole E.

In: Violence Against Women, Vol. 24, No. 1, 01.01.2018, p. 85-100.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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