Conversations with middle school students about bullying and victimization: Should we be concerned?

Victimization, Should We Be Concerned, Dorothy L. Espelage, Christine S. Asidao

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

An interview study was conducted with 89 middle school students (6th-8th grades) from three schools in mid-sized Midwestern towns. Students were asked to define bullying and were asked to describe their experiences with bullying. We elicited their opinions on why children harass each other, who are bullies and victims, how adults intervene and their thoughts on what should be done about the problem. The major themes elicited from the interviews support and expand previous research on bullying behavior and peer victimization conducted outside of the United States. Results provide important information needed for the design and implementation of future prevention and intervention programs to reduce bullying and victimization within the middle school environment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-62
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Emotional Abuse
Volume2
Issue number2-3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

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