Control-oriented modeling for smart mesoflap aeroelastic recirculation control (S.M.A.R.T)

Marina Tharayil, Andrew Alleyne

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

This paper introduces a novel concept termed Smart Mesoflaps for Aeroelastic Recirculation Transpiration (SMART) to render mass and momentum transfer for controlling shock/boundary-layer interactions (SBLI) in supersonic jet inlets. The SMART concept consists of a matrix of small flaps (sub-millimetric in thickness and of smart material composition), which are designed to undergo local aeroelastic deflection to achieve proper mass bleed or injection when subjected to shock loads. Although positive system performance is achieved using this system, the 'smart' part of the SMART is utilized to control the flap deflection to optimize the amount of recirculation (and thus the performance). This Thermally-Activated Smart Material (TASM) design uses NiTi shape memory alloy as an actuator for the flaps to control the amount of circulation. The focus of this paper will be the subsystem modeling of a single flap. After a relatively detailed model is developed, a simpler model is used to approximate the system, and it is shown that this approximation is adequate for control purposes. This model is then validated using step responses as well as closed loop experimental data.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)343-350
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Society of Mechanical Engineers, Aerospace Division (Publication) AD
Volume64
StatePublished - Dec 1 2001
Event2001 ASME International Mechanical Engineering Congress and Exposition - New York, NY, United States
Duration: Nov 11 2001Nov 16 2001

Fingerprint

Intelligent materials
deflection
smart materials
modeling
Flaps
Transpiration
Step response
momentum transfer
Momentum transfer
shock loads
Shape memory effect
transpiration
mass transfer
Boundary layers
shape memory alloys
Actuators
Mass transfer
boundary layer
boundary layers
matrix

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Mechanical Engineering
  • Space and Planetary Science

Cite this

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abstract = "This paper introduces a novel concept termed Smart Mesoflaps for Aeroelastic Recirculation Transpiration (SMART) to render mass and momentum transfer for controlling shock/boundary-layer interactions (SBLI) in supersonic jet inlets. The SMART concept consists of a matrix of small flaps (sub-millimetric in thickness and of smart material composition), which are designed to undergo local aeroelastic deflection to achieve proper mass bleed or injection when subjected to shock loads. Although positive system performance is achieved using this system, the 'smart' part of the SMART is utilized to control the flap deflection to optimize the amount of recirculation (and thus the performance). This Thermally-Activated Smart Material (TASM) design uses NiTi shape memory alloy as an actuator for the flaps to control the amount of circulation. The focus of this paper will be the subsystem modeling of a single flap. After a relatively detailed model is developed, a simpler model is used to approximate the system, and it is shown that this approximation is adequate for control purposes. This model is then validated using step responses as well as closed loop experimental data.",
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N2 - This paper introduces a novel concept termed Smart Mesoflaps for Aeroelastic Recirculation Transpiration (SMART) to render mass and momentum transfer for controlling shock/boundary-layer interactions (SBLI) in supersonic jet inlets. The SMART concept consists of a matrix of small flaps (sub-millimetric in thickness and of smart material composition), which are designed to undergo local aeroelastic deflection to achieve proper mass bleed or injection when subjected to shock loads. Although positive system performance is achieved using this system, the 'smart' part of the SMART is utilized to control the flap deflection to optimize the amount of recirculation (and thus the performance). This Thermally-Activated Smart Material (TASM) design uses NiTi shape memory alloy as an actuator for the flaps to control the amount of circulation. The focus of this paper will be the subsystem modeling of a single flap. After a relatively detailed model is developed, a simpler model is used to approximate the system, and it is shown that this approximation is adequate for control purposes. This model is then validated using step responses as well as closed loop experimental data.

AB - This paper introduces a novel concept termed Smart Mesoflaps for Aeroelastic Recirculation Transpiration (SMART) to render mass and momentum transfer for controlling shock/boundary-layer interactions (SBLI) in supersonic jet inlets. The SMART concept consists of a matrix of small flaps (sub-millimetric in thickness and of smart material composition), which are designed to undergo local aeroelastic deflection to achieve proper mass bleed or injection when subjected to shock loads. Although positive system performance is achieved using this system, the 'smart' part of the SMART is utilized to control the flap deflection to optimize the amount of recirculation (and thus the performance). This Thermally-Activated Smart Material (TASM) design uses NiTi shape memory alloy as an actuator for the flaps to control the amount of circulation. The focus of this paper will be the subsystem modeling of a single flap. After a relatively detailed model is developed, a simpler model is used to approximate the system, and it is shown that this approximation is adequate for control purposes. This model is then validated using step responses as well as closed loop experimental data.

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