Contributions of familiarity and recollection rejection to recognition: Evidence from the time course of false recognition for semantic and conjunction lures

Laura E. Matzen, Eric G. Taylor, Aaron S. Benjamin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

It has been suggested that both familiarity and recollection contribute to the recognition decision process. In this paper we leverage the form of false alarm rate functions-in which false alarm rates describe an inverted U-shaped function as the time between study and test increases-to assess how these processes support retention of semantic and surface form information from previously studied words. We directly compare the maxima of these functions for lures that are semantically related and lures that are related by surface form to previously studied material. This analysis reveals a more rapid loss of access to surface form than to semantic information. To separate the contributions of item familiarity and remindinginduced recollection rejection to this effect, we use a simple multinomial process model; this analysis reveals that this loss of access reflects both a more rapid loss of familiarity and lower rates of recollection for surface form information.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-16
Number of pages16
JournalMemory
Volume19
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 14 2011

Keywords

  • Conjunction lures
  • Familiarity
  • Multinomial process modelling
  • Recognition
  • Recollection rejection
  • Reminding
  • Semantic lures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Psychology(all)

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