Contentment and tranquility: Exploring their similarities and differences

Howard Berenbaum, Alice B. Huang, Luis E. Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Two studies explored the similarities and differences between contentment and tranquility. In Study 1, in a sample of college students (N = 154), we examined the degree to which contentment and tranquility were associated with different types of pleasurable activities. Whereas contentment was positively associated with mastery activities, tranquility was negatively associated with mastery activities. Tranquility was strongly positively associated with spiritual activities. In Study 2, in a sample of college students (N = 176), using both trait and daily diary assessments, we examined the degree to which contentment and tranquility were associated with the degree to which participants focused on the process–versus the outcome–of activities, as well as their level of acceptance. Both contentment and tranquility were positively associated with acceptance. Tranquility was also positively associated with a focus on process. Based on the results of the present research, we update our theories about contentment and tranquility.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-8
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Positive Psychology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Jun 29 2018

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Keywords

  • acceptance
  • contentment
  • pleasure
  • Positive affect
  • tranquility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

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Contentment and tranquility : Exploring their similarities and differences. / Berenbaum, Howard; Huang, Alice B.; Flores, Luis E.

In: Journal of Positive Psychology, 29.06.2018, p. 1-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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