Consumer Acceptance Comparison Between Seasoned and Unseasoned Vegetables

Yiming Feng, Marta Albiol Tapia, Kyle Okada, Nuria Blanca Castaneda Lazo, Karen Chapman-Novakofski, Carter Phillips, Soo Yeun Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Abstract: Recent findings show that approximately 87% of the U.S. population fail to meet the vegetable intake recommendations, with unpleasant taste of vegetables being listed as the primary reason for this shortfall. In this study, spice and herb seasoning was used to enhance palatability of vegetables, in order to increase consumer acceptance. In total, 749 panelists were screened and recruited as specific vegetable likers of the vegetable being tested or general vegetable likers. Four sessions were designed to evaluate the effect of seasoning within each type of vegetable, including broccoli, cauliflower, carrot, and green bean. Each panelist was only allowed to participate in one test session to evaluate only one vegetable type, so as to mitigate potential learning effect. Overall, the results showed that seasoned vegetables were significantly preferred over unseasoned vegetables (P < 0.001), indicating the sensory properties were significantly improved with seasoning. When general vegetable likers and specific vegetable likers were compared in terms of their preference between seasoned and unseasoned vegetables, the pattern varied across different vegetables; however, general trend of seasoned vegetable being preferred remained. The findings from this study demonstrate the effect of seasoning in enhancing consumer liking of vegetables, which may lead to increased consumption to be assessed in future studies. Practical Application: To improve the sensory properties of vegetables, masking the bitter taste of vegetables using spice and herb seasoning are gaining increasing attention. Our findings suggest that the overall liking of vegetables could be improved by incorporating spice and herb seasonings that are specifically formulated for each vegetable. Ultimately, developing and commercializing spice and herb seasonings may aid to increase vegetable consumption, as well as expanding the vegetable seasoning market.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)446-453
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of food science
Volume83
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

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consumer acceptance
Vegetables
vegetables
flavorings
Spices
spices
herbs
vegetable consumption
Brassica
sensory properties

Keywords

  • consumer acceptance
  • seasoning
  • vegetables

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Consumer Acceptance Comparison Between Seasoned and Unseasoned Vegetables. / Feng, Yiming; Albiol Tapia, Marta; Okada, Kyle; Castaneda Lazo, Nuria Blanca; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen; Phillips, Carter; Lee, Soo Yeun.

In: Journal of food science, Vol. 83, No. 2, 01.02.2018, p. 446-453.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Yiming ; Albiol Tapia, Marta ; Okada, Kyle ; Castaneda Lazo, Nuria Blanca ; Chapman-Novakofski, Karen ; Phillips, Carter ; Lee, Soo Yeun. / Consumer Acceptance Comparison Between Seasoned and Unseasoned Vegetables. In: Journal of food science. 2018 ; Vol. 83, No. 2. pp. 446-453.
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